All posts tagged: The Good Shepherd Agricultural Mission

Here is an Orphanage Giving to the Needy of Nepal

“We head off today. I’ll be honest, I’m a little nervous. Scared even. I don’t know quite what to expect. I have driven a fair bit through Nepal and the mountain roads are sketchy at the best of times – add an earthquake and I imagine it’s going to be a ride to remember!” This was penned by a guy I know who last week helped deliver 500 relief packages to people affected by the earthquakes in Nepal. He delivered them from the orphanage he runs with his father in Banbasa, India. An orphanage helping the Nepalese. The needy helping the needy. If ever there was a picture of the generosity that Jesus calls us to, this is it. Giving selflessly, even painfully, because the need cannot be ignored – not just giving out of duty or overflow. Clifton Shipway is the grandson of Maxton D. Strong, the founder of The Good Shepherd Agricultural Mission. He moved there from Launceston as a 19-year-old to help. He’s still there today, working as the deputy director of …

Earworms… and an Indian Orphanage that Needs Your Help

“Clap along if you feel like happiness is the truth, because I’m happy… Clap along if you know what happiness is to you…” And so on.  It’s in your head already, isn’t it? That catchy ‘Happy’ tune by Pharrell Williams, or “earworm” as psychologist Lauren Stewart called it in a recent article for The Sunday Times, has certainly enjoyed a l-o-o-o-ng popularity. “The song’s success tells us a lot about the way in which certain melodies can burrow into our brains and stay there long after the music has stopped,” Ms Stewart wrote. She explored how the use of repetition, gesture (hand claps), long note durations, gospel-style harmonies and simple rhythmic phrases result in “a cerebral high that can be as potent as any highly anticipated reward”. It explains a lot. Forgive the offense if Happy is your all-time favourite tune, but I find the lyrics to be rather trite. I get that it’s a celebration of joy and happiness, which really is admirable, but it’s the song’s carefree, toe-tapping tone of positivity that makes it …