All posts tagged: termination

You Won’t Believe What the No. 1 Aussie Killer Is…

In a gobsmacking analysis of Australian causes of death, Emily’s Voice CEO Paul O’Rourke has revealed that abortion claims the lives of more Australians than cancer, heart disease, drowning, suicide, homicide and motor vehicle accidents put together. “Each year in Australia, an estimated 96,000 children are lost as a result of surgical and chemical abortions. That’s 263 Aussie kids a day; an average-sized primary school,” he said. The breakdown is 80,000 surgical abortions and 16,000 chemical* abortions, which equates to around 3,000 more than the combined annual deaths of what is usually reported as our nation’s biggest killers: Homicides:   250 Drowning:   300 Motor vehicle accidents:   1,193 Suicide:   2,535 Cancer:   42,844 Heart disease:   45,600 Total:   92,722 Sadly, the government has not seen the importance of collecting abortion figures.  South Australia, Western Australia and the Northern Territory are the only jurisdictions that count abortions.  These figures, combined with Medicare claims for first and second trimester abortions, and hospital records, are where we land at a figure for surgical abortions in Australia. …

Wrong Way, Turn Back (Yes YOU Tassie, on all things Abortion)

The weather on Thursday suited the gloomy forecast from parliament as the Legislative Council passed the Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill, further opening up access to abortion in Tasmania.  It only needs the tick from the lower house now. A sad day for the unborn. I wonder if it was sunny in Sydney, because up there, ‘Zoe’s Law’ convincingly passed the lower house, 63 votes to 26.  You might recall the case of pregnant woman Brodie Donegan whose 36-week-old unborn child died when she was hit by a car.  This bill for the first time recognises the crime of grievous bodily harm against an unborn child. Such disparate results for life within the womb. What do you do when something you know to be intrinsically wrong, is upheld in law?  Passionate and convicted people have worked tirelessly to lobby politicians since Tasmania’s ‘Reproductive Health’ bill was introduced earlier this year.  Was all their breath and ink a waste? I don’t think so. We’ve had lively debate in the media, which in turn has ignited …

What Shame and Guilt Tell Us About Abortion

Have you seen those Emily’s Voice ads about family? The one with the woman who explains how she fell pregnant at 18 and was told her life was ruined? (watch it here) These ads, which have been running for the past few months on Tasmanian television stations, reveal in a frank and joyful voice how things turned out well in this real life teen pregnancy story. “Now, with a uni degree and four beautiful kids, I know I didn’t ruin my life or have to give up my dreams to have them – they became part of the dream. I wanted my baby and I wanted my degree – and I got both.” I’ve seen some strong opposition to the ads on Facebook, including a petition to ban these “vile ads”, and I understand there was a complaint or two lodged with one of the television stations, but I fail to see what is offensive about a woman who chose to keep her pregnancy, a woman whose choice resulted in a beautiful family. Such reaction is …

Epic Fail, Tasmanian Government, Epic Fail.

Today I have cried, I have felt the weight of Australia’s 80,000-plus lives destroyed in the womb each year and I have felt such disappointment that our government has not taken a stand for the most vulnerable citizens of this state. Last night Tasmania’s abortion bill was passed in the Lower House by two votes. Eleven pollies acknowledged the epic failings of the Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill, but 13 had the misguided notion that it is just what Tassie needs right now. “A person’s a person no matter how small.”  – Dr Seuss (Horton Hears a Who!) After all the submissions and petitions and protests, we remain unheard. And it would be easy at this point to feel defeated. That was my initial reaction. But this bill still needs to pass the Upper House, so let me hear you say, “Bring on Round Two!” Word is that it won’t be debated until May or June, so we have some time. “Abortion is the last in a long line of non-choices. “If the child …

Amended Abortion Bill Doesn’t Go Far Enough

So the abortion bill has been tabled in the Tasmanian Parliament, with a few amendments. Don’t be deceived folks. The Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill 2013 is as ludicrous as ever and we need to remain vigilant in letting politicians know that the only thing this piece of legislation is good for is compost. Here is a summary of the changes: – Unfettered access to terminations to 16 weeks (instead of 24) and thereafter (to term) with sign-off of two doctors citing medical, psychological or socio-economic reasons. – Medical practitioners with a conscientious objection would no longer be fined for failing to refer to a practitioner known not to have a conscientious objection. However, counsellors would – up to 250 penalty units ($32,500). – Added to the bill is provision for special police powers including to detain and search, and to arrest without warrant, specifically targeting those who oppose abortion. That amounts to a radical infringement of freedom. (click here to see the amended bill) The good news is that the media is reporting …

You Have TWO DAYS to be Heard on Tassie’s Barbaric Abortion Bill

Submissions close on Friday to the proposed changes to Tasmania’s abortion legislation. The so called Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill, 2013, has stirred lively discussion lately – and so it should. People are talking about when life begins. About our right to conscientious objection on such topics. About methods of termination. About the level of support available to expectant mothers. About removing red tape around adoption. The bill is frightening in that it not only seeks to allow unfettered access to abortion up to 24 weeks, and with two doctors’ sign-off up to 40 weeks (full term), but it also seeks to muzzle objection and limit a woman’s access to alternatives – choice! Read more about that here and here. If you haven’t already done so, please write a submission, however brief, and send it to public.health@dhhs.tas.gov.au or GPO Box 125 Hobart, TAS, 7001. For more info on the bill and some points you might like to include in your submission, check out this post. There are other ways you can put action to your conviction too. …

UPDATE: Tasmania’s Proposed Abortion Law Changes

I just want to start by saying a huge THANK YOU to all those people who have already written a submission to the Tasmanian government’s dismaying abortion bill. Some of you have posted those letters here on this blog, to help others frame their own response – thank you also. For those who have not written a submission… IT’S NOT TOO LATE! The initial consultation period was extended to April 5. Your letter doesn’t have to be long-winded, spouting figures and quotes and evidence. Put it simply, succinctly – just say respectfully what you think of the bill and why. Here are the links again: To view the draft Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill 2013, click here. To view the information paper on the above bill, click here. To read an article about the flaws in this bill, click here. To get informed about abortion, click here. And, most importantly, to tell our government what you think about this disastrous legislation, email public.health@dhhs.tas.gov.au or send a hard copy letter to GPO Box 125 Hobart, TAS, 7001. If you’re still …

Choose Life.

What a privilege it will be for women to have unfettered access to abortion up to 24 weeks gestation (and beyond if they get a couple of doctors on board) when the ludicrously named Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill 2013 is passed. Actually, I don’t believe it will be passed. And, tell me, what is reproductively healthy about terminating a pregnancy? There is just so much wrong with this draft piece of legislation. Was it scrawled on the back of a used envelope and handed to someone’s secretary? Did they stamp a two-week submission period on it in an attempt to curtail response (thankfully, this has now been extended by another two weeks)? Why the hurry to make Tasmania the abortion capital of Australia? I want to speak to the women out there – women like me who are of child-bearing age, who are in a rewarding career perhaps or who are enjoying study, travel, relationships. It’s a great age to be alive – I’m approaching 30. It’s a time when you’re comfy in …

Tasmania’s Proposed Abortion Law Changes

Hi friends! Many of you by now will have heard about plans afoot to change Tasmania’s laws surrounding access to abortion. In short, the draft bill is modelled on a Victorian law (2008) which allows a medical practitioner to perform abortions up to 24 weeks. After 24 weeks gestation, the woman would need written certification from two doctors, one who must be a specialist gynaecologist or obstetrician, that the pregnancy would cause a greater risk to the woman’s “well-being” than the abortion procedure. Current law in Tasmania allows abortion to 12 weeks gestation. Health Minister Michelle O’Byrne announced the draft legislation last week and since then I have had countless conversations with people who, like me, are sickened by our government’s flagrant lack of concern for the unborn. But rather than just shake our heads, we really need to act on this. We need to be heard and as submissions to the draft bill in question are only open until April 5, we need to act fast. Here is everything you need to know to …

Scourge on Society: Forced Adoptions One Generation, Abortion the Next

THE issue of forced adoptions has been the focus of a senate committee for the past 18 months and on Wednesday, the Community Affairs committee tabled its final report (Commonwealth Contribution to Former Forced Adoption Policies and Practices). I’ve been reading some of the 418 submissions, mostly from women forced to adopt their child after falling pregnant out of wedlock. These vignettes of a cruel practice perpetuated through the 1950s-1970s are utterly heart wrenching. One woman, pregnant at 18, wrote; “I will feel forever sad and sorry that I didn’t have the gumption or strength of character to be able to stand up for myself and my daughter. This is how you felt. You were so bad, so troublesome, so undeserving. What would a frightened, downtrodden and shamed young girl have to offer her child, where would she start? I could not fight my family or the society’s values at that time.” Another recalls; “I’d lie in bed every night with my arms wrapped around my baby inside of me knowing that I would never hold him after birth. I’d feel his …