All posts tagged: Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill 2013

Project Esther: the Newest Pro-Life Group on the Block

PROJECT ESTHER made it to the papers last week for its plans to organise a ‘March for the Babies’ in November in response to the passing of Tasmania’s Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Act.  This fresh-faced organisation may be unknown to you, so I made contact with its founders for a quick Q&A.  Read on for some background on Project Esther, an admirable group led by a passionate pair making a stand for the unborn. What is Project Esther? We are a small, non-profit, non-denominational, pro-life organisation that aims to deliver pro-life education to the Tasmanian public through events, programs and initiatives. Who is behind Project Esther? Project Esther is the brainchild of Gaye James and Kathy Clubb. Gaye is a mother of seven and grandmother to four. She has a BA in Social Science/Counselling and works as a Family Support Worker four days a week with the local neighbourhood centre. In her “spare” time she loves to read and occasionally dabble in writing. Kathy is mother to 13 and grandmother to five.  She home-educates and …

Wrong Way, Turn Back (Yes YOU Tassie, on all things Abortion)

The weather on Thursday suited the gloomy forecast from parliament as the Legislative Council passed the Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill, further opening up access to abortion in Tasmania.  It only needs the tick from the lower house now. A sad day for the unborn. I wonder if it was sunny in Sydney, because up there, ‘Zoe’s Law’ convincingly passed the lower house, 63 votes to 26.  You might recall the case of pregnant woman Brodie Donegan whose 36-week-old unborn child died when she was hit by a car.  This bill for the first time recognises the crime of grievous bodily harm against an unborn child. Such disparate results for life within the womb. What do you do when something you know to be intrinsically wrong, is upheld in law?  Passionate and convicted people have worked tirelessly to lobby politicians since Tasmania’s ‘Reproductive Health’ bill was introduced earlier this year.  Was all their breath and ink a waste? I don’t think so. We’ve had lively debate in the media, which in turn has ignited …

Defend the Unborn, Speak Up for the Unborn and Don’t Forget to Respect the Unborn

Most of you will know how strongly I feel about the abortion debate playing out in my home state right now. This proposed piece of legislation hiding behind women’s rights in fact does nothing to protect vulnerable women and vulnerable unborn babies. So you would think that I’d be ok with the images of aborted babies plastered around social media. They are photos of babies that many prefer to call “terminated fetuses”, mostly late-term, their dismembered bodies the colour of death, contorted, ugly, horrific. Fingers and toes, faces and torsos, lips and limbs of slaughtered babies bearing the proof of torturous deaths. You would think I would support the distribution of such images because they expose the truth – they reveal the barbaric reality of how upwards of 80,000 unborn babies are disposed of each year in Australia. Well, I don’t. I struggled to write those few lines about real-life human beings who were not only subjected to the most inhumane kinds of deaths, but photos of their dead bodies were then made public. I …

What Shame and Guilt Tell Us About Abortion

Have you seen those Emily’s Voice ads about family? The one with the woman who explains how she fell pregnant at 18 and was told her life was ruined? (watch it here) These ads, which have been running for the past few months on Tasmanian television stations, reveal in a frank and joyful voice how things turned out well in this real life teen pregnancy story. “Now, with a uni degree and four beautiful kids, I know I didn’t ruin my life or have to give up my dreams to have them – they became part of the dream. I wanted my baby and I wanted my degree – and I got both.” I’ve seen some strong opposition to the ads on Facebook, including a petition to ban these “vile ads”, and I understand there was a complaint or two lodged with one of the television stations, but I fail to see what is offensive about a woman who chose to keep her pregnancy, a woman whose choice resulted in a beautiful family. Such reaction is …

Attention: Champions of Life

Never have I been more aware of how precious life is. In the past two weeks, three friends have given birth to beautiful, healthy babies. One made her entrance at just 30 weeks, weighing less than 1.4kg. She is doing marvellously, as is mum. Sadly, I know another couple who was only given an hour with their newborn son before he breathed his last. We joined that family as they lowered a tiny coffin into the ground. Still another husband-and-wife pair have traveled such a heart-wrenching journey with their son who has cancer. They have fought for his life so gallantly, making use of all the available treatment facilities in Melbourne, praying on his behalf like the warriors they are. And my husband and I have known the grief of miscarriage recently too. Through all these separate but somehow similar situations that champion the inherent value of life, our Tasmanian government is attempting to change abortion laws to allow greater access to pregnancy termination. And for every pregnancy termination, a little life is also terminated. …

Epic Fail, Tasmanian Government, Epic Fail.

Today I have cried, I have felt the weight of Australia’s 80,000-plus lives destroyed in the womb each year and I have felt such disappointment that our government has not taken a stand for the most vulnerable citizens of this state. Last night Tasmania’s abortion bill was passed in the Lower House by two votes. Eleven pollies acknowledged the epic failings of the Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill, but 13 had the misguided notion that it is just what Tassie needs right now. “A person’s a person no matter how small.”  – Dr Seuss (Horton Hears a Who!) After all the submissions and petitions and protests, we remain unheard. And it would be easy at this point to feel defeated. That was my initial reaction. But this bill still needs to pass the Upper House, so let me hear you say, “Bring on Round Two!” Word is that it won’t be debated until May or June, so we have some time. “Abortion is the last in a long line of non-choices. “If the child …

Amended Abortion Bill Doesn’t Go Far Enough

So the abortion bill has been tabled in the Tasmanian Parliament, with a few amendments. Don’t be deceived folks. The Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill 2013 is as ludicrous as ever and we need to remain vigilant in letting politicians know that the only thing this piece of legislation is good for is compost. Here is a summary of the changes: – Unfettered access to terminations to 16 weeks (instead of 24) and thereafter (to term) with sign-off of two doctors citing medical, psychological or socio-economic reasons. – Medical practitioners with a conscientious objection would no longer be fined for failing to refer to a practitioner known not to have a conscientious objection. However, counsellors would – up to 250 penalty units ($32,500). – Added to the bill is provision for special police powers including to detain and search, and to arrest without warrant, specifically targeting those who oppose abortion. That amounts to a radical infringement of freedom. (click here to see the amended bill) The good news is that the media is reporting …

You Have TWO DAYS to be Heard on Tassie’s Barbaric Abortion Bill

Submissions close on Friday to the proposed changes to Tasmania’s abortion legislation. The so called Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill, 2013, has stirred lively discussion lately – and so it should. People are talking about when life begins. About our right to conscientious objection on such topics. About methods of termination. About the level of support available to expectant mothers. About removing red tape around adoption. The bill is frightening in that it not only seeks to allow unfettered access to abortion up to 24 weeks, and with two doctors’ sign-off up to 40 weeks (full term), but it also seeks to muzzle objection and limit a woman’s access to alternatives – choice! Read more about that here and here. If you haven’t already done so, please write a submission, however brief, and send it to public.health@dhhs.tas.gov.au or GPO Box 125 Hobart, TAS, 7001. For more info on the bill and some points you might like to include in your submission, check out this post. There are other ways you can put action to your conviction too. …

UPDATE: Tasmania’s Proposed Abortion Law Changes

I just want to start by saying a huge THANK YOU to all those people who have already written a submission to the Tasmanian government’s dismaying abortion bill. Some of you have posted those letters here on this blog, to help others frame their own response – thank you also. For those who have not written a submission… IT’S NOT TOO LATE! The initial consultation period was extended to April 5. Your letter doesn’t have to be long-winded, spouting figures and quotes and evidence. Put it simply, succinctly – just say respectfully what you think of the bill and why. Here are the links again: To view the draft Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill 2013, click here. To view the information paper on the above bill, click here. To read an article about the flaws in this bill, click here. To get informed about abortion, click here. And, most importantly, to tell our government what you think about this disastrous legislation, email public.health@dhhs.tas.gov.au or send a hard copy letter to GPO Box 125 Hobart, TAS, 7001. If you’re still …

Choose Life.

What a privilege it will be for women to have unfettered access to abortion up to 24 weeks gestation (and beyond if they get a couple of doctors on board) when the ludicrously named Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill 2013 is passed. Actually, I don’t believe it will be passed. And, tell me, what is reproductively healthy about terminating a pregnancy? There is just so much wrong with this draft piece of legislation. Was it scrawled on the back of a used envelope and handed to someone’s secretary? Did they stamp a two-week submission period on it in an attempt to curtail response (thankfully, this has now been extended by another two weeks)? Why the hurry to make Tasmania the abortion capital of Australia? I want to speak to the women out there – women like me who are of child-bearing age, who are in a rewarding career perhaps or who are enjoying study, travel, relationships. It’s a great age to be alive – I’m approaching 30. It’s a time when you’re comfy in …