All posts tagged: miracles

Mustard Seed Faith and Fish Sarnies for Lunch

The understated, two-tiered fountain is a familiar part of my home city’s CBD streetscape. I couldn’t tell you how many times I’ve walked past it. We wind our way by en route to the best lolly shop in town. My son likes to sprint around it in giddy glee as I stand in the sun nearby, letting him run off some energy. We have peered into the water, looking for coins and other treasure. We have laughed at bubbles foaming from its brim the day after some teenager tried that familiar gag with the dishwashing liquid. The historic little fountain in Launceston’s Quadrant Mall is so much a part of the furniture to a local that it almost disappears. So, when I strolled past it for the umpteenth time, a stone’s throw from the deli, just beyond the optometrist and the florist, on my way to the gift shop, it was same old, same old. Until I looked up. Right at the top of that modest little fountain is a bronze statue of a boy …

You Won’t Believe How This Million-Dollar Enterprise Began…

If you were a fly on the wall of the Madwheels workshop, you would be forgiven for thinking it was all about the cars. Tools and parts are propped against walls, fluoros throw stark light on greasy workbenches and blokes in pairs or trios are bowed over the guts of vehicles that have seen better days. “People think it’s all about the cars – it’s not. We’re all about people,” one of the Madwheels founders explains. He doesn’t want to be named, but he does want people to know that Madwheels this month celebrates its 10-year anniversary and its existence brings glory to God. God who cares about people (less so about cars). Madwheels is a workshop with a twofold purpose: restoring cars to loan or give to people in need; and providing a safe place where young people wanting more than academic learning or are at risk of disengagement can work alongside volunteers and skilled mechanics, receiving restoration of a different kind through support, encouragement, education and positive role models. Back in your fly …

A Lesson in Faith from the Woman Who Collected Jars

Meet Olive.  She is an unnamed woman in the Bible, her story found in 2 Kings, chapter 4. I’ve dubbed her Olive – for reasons that will soon become clear.  She’s just lost her husband and is feeling the weight of responsibility in taking up the new titles of single mum, provider and widow.  Things are looking pretty grim. We’ve all experienced some of the feelings this woman might have been experiencing: disempowered, fearful, perhaps even a little angry – her husband “revered the Lord” and was a man from the “company of the prophets”, yet for all his supposed favour, God wasn’t making her life particularly easy. To add insult to injury, the debt-collectors were after Olive, threatening to sell her sons into slavery to cover the debt. Desperate, she goes to Elisha, the prophet – a prophet being someone regarded as the inspired teacher or proclaimer of the will of God.  No doubt he listened to her sorry story, nodding and arching his eyebrows in all the right places. But when she stopped, …