All posts tagged: life

Twelve Weeks

This is a work of fiction that I wrote a while back. I feel rather vulnerable sharing it with you – for many reasons. Firstly, I don’t write a lot of fiction! And while I call it ‘fiction’ there are elements of truth embedded. You might be able to pick them. It’s also based on the topic closest to my heart: how immensely precious life is. I would be so grateful for any constructive feedback xxx TWELVE WEEKS Blood runs black beneath the nib hovering at Allira’s wrist. Jim smoothes the design on its scrap of paper before pressing back into flesh. He’s a redhead with blue-green eyes, freckled skin and a half-hearted goatee. The acrid whiff of cigarette smoke loiters at his teeth – he was drawing on a rolly at the shop’s steps when Allira arrived. He took his time to finish before walking in to set up. Allira sat on the couch to wait, gaping at the framed sketches of skulls, bare-breasted women and taloned creatures. The music was angry. Finally, Jim …

“I Want to Live the Kind of Life He Lived” (A Daughter To Her Dad)

Loved ones come and loved ones go. It is a reality of life that there comes an end point. Whether they meet death fresh-faced with barely a day to their name or as a sage with decades of experience and wisdom, one point remains true: life is precious. Here, Christine bravely lays bare her grief in homage to her dad who died a few months back; a man whose 82 years were lived with the kind of dignity and faith that has left the sweet kiss of legacy on those who remain. Another This Little Life story… “The hymn beautifully expressed what had been on our hearts during the 12 weeks of our dearly loved father’s hospital stay. When peace like a river flows all through my life, When sorrows like sea billows roll. Whatever my lot you have taught me to say: It is well, it is well with my soul. It was evening as the family gathered one last time to farewell Pieter, our Dad and Opa. I got the call just after …

What I Wish I’d Said That Day At That Fancy Restaurant, Eating 8-Courses While in Labour…

I wish I’d done the unthinkable that day.  I wish I’d said poo to social etiquette and spoken what I desperately wanted to. Very loudly. You see, when the labour pangs began, I didn’t really believe them.  We were going out to dinner, a classy restaurant with friends – their shout.  And as the contractions came and went, I gritted my teeth and worked my way through the eight-course banquet. Finally, just after the wok-seared beef fillets with field mushrooms and before the bomb Alaska, I leaned across to my husband and said, “We need to go!” Here’s the way I wish it had unfolded:  I heaved myself to my feet, looked around the now-full restaurant and shrilled in my loudest voice, “We’re going to have our baby!” (clutching my stomach as another contraction took hold). The room first went silent, then erupted in applause as people laughed in shock and delight at our announcement. As we left, people yelled their well-wishes at us. Complete strangers shook our hands and the wait staff helped us …

Intermission: Between the Cancer Death of One Child and the Birth of a New Baby

If you were to ask me, “Who is the most inspiring person in your life?”, chances are I would name Rebecca Fogarty.  She is a dear friend, one who has navigated extreme hardship with Godly wisdom, dignity and courage.  I want to be like her!  She’s also extremely eloquent, so I won’t rabbit on. These are her words, another This Little Life story that demonstrates the inherent value of life. (Rebecca first shared this story at the 2014 Flourish women’s event in Launceston) “Intermission. The break in the middle of the show that allows you to get something to eat, go to the loo or talk to the person next to you. Intermission is also the name we have given the last nine weeks. It has been a time without children…between children. While excruciatingly painful it has also been a valuable chance to rest, to talk and to think. What I am about to share is sad but it turns out okay so please trust me and come with me on this. My son Leo was …

Having an Abortion in Launceston is “Like Going to the Dentist”

When it comes to facing an unwanted pregnancy in Australia, choice is apparently what women want. But is that what they get? When a vulnerable young woman books an appointment with her GP or walks into a youth support service – is she presented with the full gamut of options out there? Or is she given the option that the professional thinks is ‘most appropriate’ to her situation?  Recently I had the opportunity to ask these questions of a woman who had an abortion in Launceston when she was 19. While the laws have since changed, making abortion more accessible, her answers give an interesting snapshot of how our society handles abortion and the mental health repercussions. This Q & A makes up a part of Sandra’s story (not her real name). When did you have your abortion and how old were you? 2007; I was 19. How far along were you when you had the abortion? Nearly 11 weeks. Where did you go first when you realised you had an unwanted pregnancy? The Corner*. …

What the Turtles Told Me About Resting and Waiting

Every evening at dusk on our recent holiday to Vanuatu we paddled a canoe from our island resort to a nearby reef.  Once positioned where juicy beds of seaweed waved long fingers in the tide, we lifted our paddles to nurse them on our knees and wait.  We scanned the translucent blue, drifting, silent. And then we would hear the telltale sigh or snort, the release of air as a sea turtle surfaced nearby.  We would watch their head and shell break through the salty deep to glance left, right, left and dive once more. Hubby and I would share a wordless smile. Every day these shy creatures would venture into the shallows to feed on the sea grasses at dusk and dawn.  Sometimes they would swim in reaching distance of our canoe and glide beneath us, giving a rare glimpse at their mottled backs and flippers.  But the instant we dipped our paddles back into the water to follow them or attempt to get a closer look, they would disappear, leaving nothing so much …

“Against Medical Advice I Chose Not To Abort.” This Mum’s Story Will Bring Hope – And Tears!

Doctors are not gods.  I’ll say it again, doctors are not gods.  They get it wrong and all too often their prognosis allows no room for the extraordinary.  This was the barrier that would have prevented Chercara and Tim from raising a family of their own.  Chercara shares how faith and a deep-seated value of life raised hope in her heart, not for one miracle, but two.  A This Little Life story… “I have six children but can only hold two of them in my arms.  If I was to heed the advice of many of the doctors and nurses responsible for my antenatal care, I wouldn’t even have these, my two beautiful boys. Losing our first baby was not only one of the hardest things for me and hubby Tim to endure but it made me lose faith in the medical system. I met Tim when I was 18 – it was ‘love at first sight’.  Within a month we were dating, another month and he asked me to marry him and a month …

Reuben’s Little Life – So Short, So Sweet.

What is the measure of a life?  I have watched a very dear friend travel a painful journey through the pregnancy, birth, life and death of her second son, Reuben.  Kristy and her husband Luke have an inexplicable peace around Reuben’s 34-week life within the womb and 55-minute life outside.  Here, for the first instalment of This Little Life, Kristy shares his story. “Reuben Edric Dadson decided to arrive at 1:55am on the 19th March 2013 after 34 weeks of life inside.  He was born naturally and quickly and the midwife lifted him straight up onto my chest.  The room filled with a warmth that I had only experienced one other time, at the birth of our first son less than two years before. Reuben lay peacefully, his sticky warm body quivering every so often.  He made a few little noises, but didn’t cry as most newborn babies do.  Luke, my husband, was lying next to me on the hospital bed, one arm around me, the other touching Reuben’s little face and body every so …

Wrong Way, Turn Back (Yes YOU Tassie, on all things Abortion)

The weather on Thursday suited the gloomy forecast from parliament as the Legislative Council passed the Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Bill, further opening up access to abortion in Tasmania.  It only needs the tick from the lower house now. A sad day for the unborn. I wonder if it was sunny in Sydney, because up there, ‘Zoe’s Law’ convincingly passed the lower house, 63 votes to 26.  You might recall the case of pregnant woman Brodie Donegan whose 36-week-old unborn child died when she was hit by a car.  This bill for the first time recognises the crime of grievous bodily harm against an unborn child. Such disparate results for life within the womb. What do you do when something you know to be intrinsically wrong, is upheld in law?  Passionate and convicted people have worked tirelessly to lobby politicians since Tasmania’s ‘Reproductive Health’ bill was introduced earlier this year.  Was all their breath and ink a waste? I don’t think so. We’ve had lively debate in the media, which in turn has ignited …

Write Your Own Obituary

You are flicking through the paper when you stumble across a story with your name in the headline – it’s your own obituary.  There in black and white is your life story, a weighing-up of your achievements and legacy. This was the reality for Alfred Nobel. When his brother Ludvig passed away while visiting Cannes in 1888, a French newspaper erroneously printed that Alfred had died.  He opened the paper to find out what had been written about his brother only to find an account of his own life, describing him as the inventor of dynamite. “Le marchand de la mort est mort,” the obituary stated (The merchant of death is dead).  “Dr Alfred Nobel, who became rich by finding ways to kill more people faster than ever before, died yesterday,” the article continued. I think it would be safe to say that Alfred was shocked and disappointed with what he read that day about his contribution to mankind. Faced with this unique situation, he recognised an opportunity to rewrite his own legacy – the …