All posts tagged: girls

Thanks for the tips Mr Biddulph: 3 Ways to Support Girls

There I was, standing in my bedroom, selecting an outfit for the day ahead. Little Miss Two was at my side, as usual, watching my every move. I chose my super slimming, high-rise, black jeans, the ones that take a fair bit of jiggling to get on. A merino long-sleeved top (a thermal, in other words, I live in Tasmania afterall). And a light grey oversized knit that feels like I’m wrapped in a blanket. There, I’m thinking. Ready. It’s about then that I notice my little blonde-haired girl waving her rear-end at the mirror. She’s peering over her shoulder, gawking at her nappy-cushioned bottom… just like I do. The good old, “Does my bum look big in this?” move. I was shocked. I could’ve cried. My darling bundle of innocence had picked up on a rather shallow habit of mine. But I didn’t – I just laughed. I swung her up into my arms and laughed and laughed with her. She knew she’d done something endearing and she joined me with her wonderful giggles of …

Walking the Catwalk of True Beauty

A friend went to the dancing competitions recently with her three young girls in tow. She expected a chance to appreciate the talent and dedication of our city’s fledgling dancers, to ooh and aah over the costumes with her daughters and just have a fun, girly time together. She also expected to feel that old pang of connection to her childhood days when it was her up on the stage, leaping and twirling, smiling heartily in a cloud of glitter and sequins. Instead she walked away feeling cold. “How things have changed,” she said to me. “I wish I hadn’t taken my daughters to see that.” What seven or eight-year-old’s performance could evoke such a response? She described little girls dressed in costumes more suited to a gentleman’s club, gyrating like Miley with saucy moves and expressions far beyond their years. Another dad relayed how uncomfortable he felt seated in the stalls of the local theatre, waiting for his daughter to perform. He thought they’d all be wearing pretty dresses, leaping and pirouetting around the …

Beauty is More than a Sexy Selfie

I think we all know someone with a selfie obsession. They post photos of themselves on various social media sites in different mundane situations expecting us to like, share, favourite, retweet and even comment on such humdrum proclamations as: “New lipstick!” (photo: lips pouting, eyes bulging like a Bratz doll). “Having a fat day” (photo: sad face, skinny jeans proffering a lean little bum). “Lunch!” (photo: a smoothie, ‘nuff said). Er, why? Why oh why oh why do people waste their precious moments on this? I shall pause briefly here to accommodate the decreasing percentage of the populace who have not caught up with the social media craze (c’mon dad, it’s about time!) A ‘selfie’ is “a slang term used to describe a photo that is taken of oneself for the purpose of uploading it to social networking sites and image sharing websites… To take a selfie, the right or left arm is extended with the camera held backwards.” (webopedia.com) All us social media users are prone to the occasional selfie but it’s worth pondering the why …

The Case for Resilience

Australian psychologist Andrew Fuller describes resilience as “the happy knack of being able to bungy jump through the pitfalls of life”. I know that feeling. One summer on a family holiday in Cairns I took the jump and felt that heady mix of trepidation and exhilaration, followed by the joy of accomplishment. I’ve known the same muddle of emotions when life has heaved with difficulty, when circumstance has greyed the horizon. Resilience is an imperative ingredient in life, but the social landscape of Australia is such that children are becoming adults without the ability to deal with the hardship that inevitably comes. Girls cop it worst. Like a flower amongst weeds they must navigate past issues of body image, the sexualised media, relationship breakdown, identity and so on. Learn resilience, or choke. It was while holding a clothes stall at a local market last weekend that I got talking to some women about resilience. Launcestonians Michelle Dingemanse and Kylea Aldred have a business called Little Bird that runs two programs for primary and high school-aged girls designed …