All posts tagged: freedom

The Positives to Having 4 Teeth Extracted in the Chair.

The day arrived. The day I had dreaded for more than a decade. The day I would have all my wisdom teeth ripped from my delicate, pink gums – in the chair, no less, and without sedation. People said, “You’ll be fine!” “The recovery is quick!” and “Get it over and done with!” Some particularly good advice saw me taking earphones and a good music mix, something to drown out the sound of the jackhammer, or whatever they call those instruments of… dental remedy. I should’ve chosen heavy metal. I chose The Loft Sessions (Bethel). I felt good. Ten years and two experiences of childbirth felt like sufficient preparation. As a friend said to me, “Having problem teeth pulled has been so much less traumatic than the pain of having them remain.” Why is that? Why do we get so cosy and comfortable with pain? Why do we get so used to living with shackles, to the point where we forget what it is to be free? We hug that pain and imprisonment close because …

What I Wish I’d Said That Day At That Fancy Restaurant, Eating 8-Courses While in Labour…

I wish I’d done the unthinkable that day.  I wish I’d said poo to social etiquette and spoken what I desperately wanted to. Very loudly. You see, when the labour pangs began, I didn’t really believe them.  We were going out to dinner, a classy restaurant with friends – their shout.  And as the contractions came and went, I gritted my teeth and worked my way through the eight-course banquet. Finally, just after the wok-seared beef fillets with field mushrooms and before the bomb Alaska, I leaned across to my husband and said, “We need to go!” Here’s the way I wish it had unfolded:  I heaved myself to my feet, looked around the now-full restaurant and shrilled in my loudest voice, “We’re going to have our baby!” (clutching my stomach as another contraction took hold). The room first went silent, then erupted in applause as people laughed in shock and delight at our announcement. As we left, people yelled their well-wishes at us. Complete strangers shook our hands and the wait staff helped us …

Five Questions to Ask Before You Post THAT Comment or Photo

Rules bring freedom.  It’s strange but true that a certain amount of structure and regulation enables us to live – and to do so with a decreased (or non-existent) shackle of worry regarding safety, wellbeing and enjoyment. Red light means stop, green light means go; a rule that brings the liberty to drive from Point A to Point B, without risk of injury to self or others. In the fire safety book that my three-year-old son has fixated on, there’s a “Two-metres from the heater” rhyme.  We have the freedom to enjoy a heater’s warmth, without its burn, if we adhere to such advice. Sundays in our household are TV-free days.  This rule gives us freedom to enjoy each other’s company more completely – to read, talk, play boardgames and go for long walks. Rules protect us. If ever there was a sphere that lacked healthy regulation it would be social media.  Nowhere will you find more disrespectful, hateful, abusive or crude material as in the annals of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest and all those …

Covering the Faith Base

Jehovah’s Witnesses knock on doors.  Muslims eat halal food.  Hare Krishnas wear distinctive orange robes.  Buddhists meditate.  What of Christians? All these religions are committed to some kind of meaningful custom that sets them apart and honours their concept of god.  Modern Christianity, however, seems increasingly devoid of distinction, bending to the ways of its culture. I realise this isn’t necessarily bad or wrong.  It is in an attempt to remain relevant, after all, that the modern church features pop-style worship music over traditional hymns, services that employ the latest mixed-media innovations, shortened sermons to meet our shortened attention spans and social media engagement. But how do you know me to be a follower of Christ?  What sets me apart? The Bible is the believer’s life manual.  If that’s the case, and we’re serious about our convictions, perhaps we should be recognised by its physical presence in our home, handbag, workplace and car.  Perhaps we should be set apart by the fact we have our nose in it at every opportunity.  Not a common sight, …

Overcoming Pew-Bum to Appreciate Julia’s Heavenly Notes

Julia Stone live is a treat. But Julia Stone performing live in an historic sandstone church is something else. A bunch of friends jumped in a car after work last Tuesday headed for the popular singer-songwriter’s concert at St David’s Cathedral in Hobart, part of her Heavenly Sounds tour. We were late and a little saddle-sore when we squeezed into a pew with a view to the stage – if you leaned forward and craned your neck around one of the church’s enormous sandstone columns, that is. Initial thoughts were: maybe the church venue wasn’t such an inspired idea – my butt was already heading towards numb and I could feel each ridge of vertebra in my spine if I sat at anything but a right angle. Seriously – the guy who invented pews has a lot to answer for. Then she came from the dark onto the stage in her vintage lace dress, like a pretty moth to the light. She stood there, already swaying, demure and smiling widely. Then, boom. A sound incongruent …

Where faith, undies and mushrooms meet

Faith is like a reeealy comfy pair of undies. Just the right size, good cheek coverage, made from soft, breathable cotton and with elastic that is firm but not so firm as to indent that fleshy nether region. Faith is like a reeealy comfy pair of undies because, while it remains largely unseen, it keeps everything in its place. My analogy is desperately lacking… Welcome to my blog anyway. Really, I just want to use this space to express how different faith and religion are. If faith is the comfy pair of undies, then religion is the belt strapped tight and rigid at the waist. Religion tends to restrict the freedom found in faith. There’s this general misconception that religion and faith are inexorably linked, like twin sisters, but it’s just not the case. See, I’m of the opinion that religion would do well to loosen a few notches. Go all the way and rip that restricting strap from your belt notches and let live. I’m sorry. This analogy is spewing images that were completely …