All posts filed under: Books

Come to the book launch. Yes, you!

Hi, ho! I’ve been a bit quiet on the blog front. Apart from the #caravanryn travel updates of course. Wanna know why? Because I’m planning a book launch. I’ve never done one of these before and it turns out there’s lots of itty bitty logistical things one must throw energy at. One such thing is inviting people to attend. Which I’ve done. But I have thus far failed to cordially invite YOU, my faithful blog subscribers. So here is your official invite. And I know many of you are from far-flung places and aren’t exactly going to hop on a plane for the occasion, but it’s nice to be invited, right? And for those who CAN make it, gosh I’m looking forward to seeing your lovely faces. It’s gonna be a great time of celebrating what God has brought to fruition. The details FLaM (Faith Like a Mushroom) book launch Saturday October 27, 5pm Foundry, 22 Cameron Street, Launceston The book Is it even a book? THAT is a very good question. My friend has …

The year in books (2017)

Once again I’m going to tell you just how marvellous it is to be part of a book club. We call ourselves The Romans 12:2 Project, because we’re all keen for this “renewing of the mind” business. Especially when it comes to seeking God’s will for our lives. We’re a rabble of women, meeting every five weeks or so, spurring each other on as we sink our teeth into a feast of words, glorious words! Here are the books I’ve read this year. Not in any particular order. Healing Begins in the Heart, by Karen Mace. Moving Mountains, by John Eldredge. The Sacred Year, by Michael Yankoski. Present Over Perfect, by Shauna Niequist. Rest: Living in Sabbath Simplicity, by Kerri Wyatt Kent. Revealing Heaven, by Kat Kerr. Life Together, by Dietrich Bonhoeffer. The Passion of Dolssa, by Julie Berry. Wearing God, by Lauren F. Winner. My Seventh Monsoon, by Naomi Reed. (I also read Congo Dawn by Tasmanian author Katherine Scholes, which was a great fiction novel! Good for holiday escapism!) The exercise of writing …

The Year in Books (2016)

This post is more a personal record than anything else. A look back at the books I’ve read in 2016, the learnings from them, and the way God has used them to expand my Christian worldview. I’ve explained before that I am part of a book club. We call ourselves The Romans 12:2 Project, meet every five weeks or so, and read books that will expand our understanding of God, faith and what it is to be a Christian today. These are the books we read this year… of course, I did read beyond this selection, a few leisure reads (Maeve Binchy, Paullina Simons and even Lee Childs!) and additional recommendations from friends and family (Annette Mace’s book, and I can highly recommend The Grace Outpouring too, by David Roberts and Roy Godwin). But these are the books we discussed: The Gift of Being Yourself by David G. Benner Love, Tears and Autism by Cecily Paterson The King Jesus Gospel by Scot McKnight A Praying Life by Paul E. Miller Farewell Four Waters by Kate …

The NY Resolution that Exceeded Expectation.

Flicking to my journal entries from this time last year was a deflating exercise – not only because there were so few pages to flick through, but because the scribblings under the heading New Years Resolutions were largely unrealised. I made some feeble initial efforts, but life shouldered in on these well-intentioned plans to build character, skill and achievement. Oh well, there’s always 2016! But I want to tell you about the one aspiration that did become a reality – and so much better than I could have anticipated. I love reading. For me, the holiday sensation comes when I am diving headlong into fiction narrative – from the comfort of an armchair, banana lounge or hammock. I read to escape. Which is why, pre-2015, were you to espouse the merits of so-and-so’s latest autobiography, self-help book or account of lifechange, my eyes would have glazed over. I wanted to like those books. I wanted to allow my life to be altered by them. I wanted to rave with friends over the way those books had opened …